Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Login


Take the time to read our Privacy Policy.

7 Pages«<567
castellan Online
#121 Posted : Thursday, 15 April 2021 5:28:26 PM(UTC)
castellan

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 26/02/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,503

Thanks: 13 times
Was thanked: 24 time(s) in 22 post(s)
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
It’s a shame the 253 didn’t get the fuel injection update like the 5 litre. I know time moves on, but it had to have been a better engine that the V6 that replaced the smaller capacity engines.


I think they did their home work on such and the 3.8L won out.
Them VN V6 went well back in the days but for the f ing horror chaff cuter noise even the VR sound shit, but the VS all that shit was gone and a good thing to drive for what it was. I put my order in even before the VS came out. you could run 92 octane in them with 9.35:1 compression now that's saying something with iron heads, boy that's proof of quality design to run 92 on iron heads with 9.35:1

Due to the Jap currency jumping up with the Nissan 3.0L 6 cyl in the VL. Holden had to jump to that USA chaff cutter V6 what a shocking noisy engine it was, Hell even the Red motors were more refined than that junk.

I would say that the best all round engine for the average person with an automatic from 1969 to the VH Commodore was the 253.
HK1837 Offline
#122 Posted : Thursday, 15 April 2021 6:12:12 PM(UTC)
HK1837

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 13,571

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 255 time(s) in 246 post(s)
Originally Posted by: castellan Go to Quoted Post


I think they did their home work on such and the 3.8L won out.
Them VN V6 went well back in the days but for the f ing horror chaff cuter noise even the VR sound shit, but the VS all that shit was gone and a good thing to drive for what it was. I put my order in even before the VS came out. you could run 92 octane in them with 9.35:1 compression now that's saying something with iron heads, boy that's proof of quality design to run 92 on iron heads with 9.35:1

Due to the Jap currency jumping up with the Nissan 3.0L 6 cyl in the VL. Holden had to jump to that USA chaff cutter V6 what a shocking noisy engine it was, Hell even the Red motors were more refined than that junk.

I would say that the best all round engine for the average person with an automatic from 1969 to the VH Commodore was the 253.


I agree, my VS V6 manual ute I bought in December 2000 was a good car. I wanted a V8 but was too late, however that V6 had good power, was smooth and I regularly got 30mpg out of it.

Yes, the 253/4.2 was a good all round engine. If you fitted dual exhaust and the intake plus Quadrajet from a 308 they were great little engines. The HT to HJ versions came with highway ratio rear axles 3.08 (manual) or 2.78 (auto). All you’d need to do with them by the time they were 5-8 years old was fit a new cam and lifters and normally avast iron body oil pump, the rest went for a long time. 283 and 307 were the same, just needed a 4BBL intake and Quadrajet but didn’t chew out cams like a Holden V8.

The down side of the HT to HG was the 253 got the dreaded banjo, however Salisbury were plentiful in 3.08 ratio. The upside was they all had decent boxes be it the M15 3spd, M21 Saginaw or ‘glide or Trimatic. At least you could get a 3spd or a Trimatic in a HQ-HJ, not the dreaded Aussie 4spd. Probably the best all round choices for towing, reversing trailers, carrying loads and highway cruising would be a HG 253 3spd ute with the diff changed out to a 3.08 LSD Salisbury. Or a HJ 4.2 3spd or Trimatic with integrated A/C, power steering and LSD, 3.08 manual or 2.78 auto.

Edited by user Thursday, 15 April 2021 6:19:54 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

_______________________________________________________
If we all had the same (good) taste, who would buy all the Fords?
AC Offline
#123 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 12:06:00 AM(UTC)
AC

Rank: Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 24/01/2021(UTC)
Posts: 16
Australia
Location: Perth

Thanks: 11 times
I bought new a VS Acclaim in Sherbrooke Green and optioned with power windows. It was gutsy and very refined. Being an early build it had twin exhaust pipes after the catalyst, into separate mufflers and then meeting again at the rear. Later VS Commodores were single all the way, probably for cost cutting reasons. I thought that it had a nice sound. It reminds me of my brother’s immaculate VN SS. It is an early build and has fabricated exhaust manifolds rather than cast iron.

Edited by user Friday, 16 April 2021 12:06:59 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

HK1837 Offline
#124 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 6:56:32 AM(UTC)
HK1837

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 13,571

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 255 time(s) in 246 post(s)
Those VN and VP 5.0L were always stainless headers. It wasn’t until sometime in VR or thereabouts they changed to cast.
_______________________________________________________
If we all had the same (good) taste, who would buy all the Fords?
Dr Terry Offline
#125 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 7:53:29 AM(UTC)
Dr Terry

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 5,697

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 114 time(s) in 106 post(s)
Originally Posted by: HK1837 Go to Quoted Post
283 and 307 were the same, just needed a 4BBL intake and Quadrajet but didn’t chew out cams like a Holden V8.


Disagree. The early SBC V8s had their issues with cams as well. By the time the large journal motors came around the cam lobe trouble was sorted, so 307s didn't suffer from it, as much as 283s did, but the SBCs also had the nylon toothed cam gear which aged quickly which resulted in rattly chains & retarded cam timing.

When Holden were looking at V8 designs in the early 60s the SBC wasn't the 'pillar of virtue' we see today, otherwise Fred James & the boys would've just used it. Why re-invent the wheel if the old wheel was that good.

Dr Terry

Edited by user Friday, 16 April 2021 7:55:22 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

If at first you don't succeed, just call it Version 1.0
HK1837 Offline
#126 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 9:18:51 AM(UTC)
HK1837

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 13,571

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 255 time(s) in 246 post(s)
I'd forgotten about the nylon timing gears in 283's. All the ones I had I'd pulled the engine apart to make sure all good, checked bore and bearing clearances, fitted new gaskets and welsh plugs and put back together. Those plastic timing gears were reported to fail like clockwork around 60,000 miles so I never came across one so must have been changed out.

GMH's choice to make their own engine was an economic one. Using an imported one for the masses was never really a consideration, only by necessity for the 307 as the 253 wasn't ready. There was no guarantee it would even have been a V8. They determined prior to 1965 that they'd need a 250ci engine for 1969. Due to the need to mass produce to make it economical they also decide to build the same engine so it could be made in a 300+ cube version so then it was decided to make it a V8. One of the biggest factors in consideration to build it locally was the Australian Government Tariff Regulation, and their studies showed that the volume, longevity against the Capital investment was an economical proposition. The only thing I haven't been able to nail exactly is why they chose to design a whole new engine, rather than build a SBC design locally. The best info that I have been able to find is that:

1. They initially determined fitting the SBC design into the GMH chassis was a problem - the rear oil pump and rear steering on the proposed HK, HT, HQ and HU/HV was an issue.
2. The engine had specific dimension requirements so that the 5 x VAP's could assemble the HK-HU/HV and beyond utilising the body drop method without expensive modifications at the VAP's. Those dimensions were:

Length including 3 belt tracks and viscous torque fan drive: 29.02"
Width, symmetrical around the centreline: 22"
Height from crank centre to top of air cleaner: 18.5"
Weight dry: 480lb.
Satisfied with 97 RON grade fuel.

The 307 exceeded all of these, although a 307 auto engine was under 480lb. Width was over 23". Length with the fan was over 30". A SBC is about 17.7" from the crank to the top of the dizzy cap, so probably would also exceed the height requirement even with a drop base air cleaner. Whether or not the Engineers came up with these figures so they literally had to make their own engines, or they were the maximum dimensions fro body drop I don't know.
_______________________________________________________
If we all had the same (good) taste, who would buy all the Fords?
Dr Terry Offline
#127 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 9:57:01 AM(UTC)
Dr Terry

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 5,697

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 114 time(s) in 106 post(s)
I agree with all the local production issues, but if we cast & machined SBCs here (as they do in Canada) then the local production economy side of things is sorted. If we just fitted an alloy intake then the weight issue was largely solved as well.

My point was that if the SBC was fully sorted in 1964 (which it wasn't) then decision to built a V8 unique to Aust, may not have happened. As it turned out the Aussie V8 was better suited to us in the long term.

Dr Terry
If at first you don't succeed, just call it Version 1.0
wbute Offline
#128 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 10:22:41 AM(UTC)
wbute

Rank: Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 25/01/2010(UTC)
Posts: 960

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 13 time(s) in 12 post(s)
Holden had issues with the internal oil pump setup too. I know they made a point of having the oil external as a design feature, among many other things as pointed out.
They really nailed a good design with the cam wear issue being the only real bad point. A lot of that was related to cold start running with city driving I believe. They didn’t seem to have the lobe wear issue if they did long running.

Edited by user Friday, 16 April 2021 10:25:36 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

HK1837 Offline
#129 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 10:38:01 AM(UTC)
HK1837

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 13,571

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 255 time(s) in 246 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Dr Terry Go to Quoted Post
I agree with all the local production issues, but if we cast & machined SBCs here (as they do in Canada) then the local production economy side of things is sorted. If we just fitted an alloy intake then the weight issue was largely solved as well.

My point was that if the SBC was fully sorted in 1964 (which it wasn't) then decision to built a V8 unique to Aust, may not have happened. As it turned out the Aussie V8 was better suited to us in the long term.

Dr Terry


The size wasn’t though. AFAIK they couldn’t body drop with a SBC design.

_______________________________________________________
If we all had the same (good) taste, who would buy all the Fords?
HK1837 Offline
#130 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 10:42:38 AM(UTC)
HK1837

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 13,571

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 255 time(s) in 246 post(s)
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
Holden had issues with the internal oil pump setup too. I know they made a point of having the oil external as a design feature, among many other things as pointed out.
They really nailed a good design with the cam wear issue being the only real bad point. A lot of that was related to cold start running with city driving I believe. They didn’t seem to have the lobe wear issue if they did long running.


I think a lot of the Holden cam issue was the oil pump. When you read Fred James’ report they had massive oil pump issues, from no priming through to wear issues some of which they ‘solved’ by anodising the alloy housing. Other issues with the bypass. You don’t get those issues with a SBC. The reason they stuck it externally was so the overall height was achieved and also to make it easier to adapt it to many different chassis and steering.

_______________________________________________________
If we all had the same (good) taste, who would buy all the Fords?
Smitty2 Offline
#131 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 12:08:53 PM(UTC)
Smitty2

Rank: Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/07/2019(UTC)
Posts: 117
Australia
Location: bayside Melbourne

Thanks: 84 times
Was thanked: 9 time(s) in 9 post(s)
Originally Posted by: HK1837 Go to Quoted Post
.....
The size wasn’t though. AFAIK they couldn’t body drop with a SBC design.



that is correct... due to the engine design.

The leading cylinder on both 308 and 253 castings is No1.. being on the drivers side
and on Chev SB is No2 (for us in here).. being the front cylinder on the passenger side.

The Aussie V8 design pulls No7 cylinder forward and allows space for steering (mainly)
and brake parts which otherwise would make contact with the block if the Chev was used.
Club circuit racing...the best fun you can have with your pants on
Smitty2 Offline
#132 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 12:39:15 PM(UTC)
Smitty2

Rank: Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/07/2019(UTC)
Posts: 117
Australia
Location: bayside Melbourne

Thanks: 84 times
Was thanked: 9 time(s) in 9 post(s)
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
.....................
They really nailed a good design with the cam wear issue being the only real bad point. A lot of that was related to cold start running with city driving I believe. They didn’t seem to have the lobe wear issue if they did long running.



dunno ... but I will repeat some comments made over the years to me (yep, I am a victim of missing cam lobes ! ) by
a number of fairly well respected engine buiders (Tate, Burns, Berryman) that the camshaft issue cause was ... oils

Castrol GTX (remember that? ) was under no circumstances, never ever to be used in a Holden V8....said Tatey
(and he laughed about the Castrol stickers on various Commodore and Torana race cars under the HDT banner)
Brian Berryman essentially repeated that...when he fixed the lack of camshaft lobe lift on the ol'mans HX 253 Kingswood
(with a new shaft and lifters, pushrods and rockers in that engine)

and remember, there was no running in of camshafts in Plant 16 at FB . Engine start covered a number of tests, no leaks etc
... all done in a few minutes for each engine (before going onto a stand and sealed for shipping to VAPs (via Plant 17)

plus the factory fill was some weird Castrol Multigrade 20W-40 (pumped into the engine test area tanks weekly from the Castrol tankers)

Club circuit racing...the best fun you can have with your pants on
Dr Terry Offline
#133 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 12:50:21 PM(UTC)
Dr Terry

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 5,697

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 114 time(s) in 106 post(s)
I understand about the 'body drop' but the issue was with the width, i.e. fitting the complete assembly between the frame rails, from underneath. If they widened the rail spacing just a bit, job done. Wasn't needed if they designed their own engine which they did.

Also AFAIK putting the driver's side bank forward was to clear the wiper motor. Steering wasn't a problem & all the brake m/cyl etc. was above & to side of the engine.

Dr Terry
If at first you don't succeed, just call it Version 1.0
wbute Offline
#134 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 2:05:37 PM(UTC)
wbute

Rank: Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 25/01/2010(UTC)
Posts: 960

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 13 time(s) in 12 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Smitty2 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
.....................
They really nailed a good design with the cam wear issue being the only real bad point. A lot of that was related to cold start running with city driving I believe. They didn’t seem to have the lobe wear issue if they did long running.



dunno ... but I will repeat some comments made over the years to me (yep, I am a victim of missing cam lobes ! ) by
a number of fairly well respected engine buiders (Tate, Burns, Berryman) that the camshaft issue cause was ... oils

Castrol GTX (remember that? ) was under no circumstances, never ever to be used in a Holden V8....said Tatey
(and he laughed about the Castrol stickers on various Commodore and Torana race cars under the HDT banner)
Brian Berryman essentially repeated that...when he fixed the lack of camshaft lobe lift on the ol'mans HX 253 Kingswood
(with a new shaft and lifters, pushrods and rockers in that engine)

and remember, there was no running in of camshafts in Plant 16 at FB . Engine start covered a number of tests, no leaks etc
... all done in a few minutes for each engine (before going onto a stand and sealed for shipping to VAPs (via Plant 17)

plus the factory fill was some weird Castrol Multigrade 20W-40 (pumped into the engine test area tanks weekly from the Castrol tankers)



Highly likely. Castrol seemed to have a bad reputation. Don’t know if it was deserved or not, people seem to get more twisted up over oil than anything else with cars and bikes lol.
Tate should have known all there was to know about Holden V8’s though.
castellan Online
#135 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 6:14:39 PM(UTC)
castellan

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 26/02/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,503

Thanks: 13 times
Was thanked: 24 time(s) in 22 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Smitty2 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
.....................
They really nailed a good design with the cam wear issue being the only real bad point. A lot of that was related to cold start running with city driving I believe. They didn’t seem to have the lobe wear issue if they did long running.



dunno ... but I will repeat some comments made over the years to me (yep, I am a victim of missing cam lobes ! ) by
a number of fairly well respected engine buiders (Tate, Burns, Berryman) that the camshaft issue cause was ... oils

Castrol GTX (remember that? ) was under no circumstances, never ever to be used in a Holden V8....said Tatey
(and he laughed about the Castrol stickers on various Commodore and Torana race cars under the HDT banner)
Brian Berryman essentially repeated that...when he fixed the lack of camshaft lobe lift on the ol'mans HX 253 Kingswood
(with a new shaft and lifters, pushrods and rockers in that engine)

and remember, there was no running in of camshafts in Plant 16 at FB . Engine start covered a number of tests, no leaks etc
... all done in a few minutes for each engine (before going onto a stand and sealed for shipping to VAPs (via Plant 17)

plus the factory fill was some weird Castrol Multigrade 20W-40 (pumped into the engine test area tanks weekly from the Castrol tankers)



I have always said not to use that GTX some time after when it first came out in flat bottom lifter engines. I did not know that Tate or Burns said such. I always had a real good look at the parts of engines when I pulled them down or looked at what was pulled down at a mates servo.
His boss sold and used GTX and I seen the proof of his customers cars engines.

Brock used that GTX crap and they had many problems with Cams I believe.
It was when this oil came out that cars started chewing out cams.

I think the GTX back in the day was good for dirt bikes like XR 600 etc because it could handle the heat and not evaporate, some 4stroke dirt bikes would use from the top of the stick to the bottom in a good days riding esp on hot days, but with a change of type of oil you could save yourself the worry using so much, it was 20w-50 mainly that I used. some claim that by using thicker oil you will use less, but that was not the case, just some evaporated due to such heat I believe.

Another oil now that I think is bad is magnatec if it is used past the point that such should be changed, maybe it's better nowadays improved but from what I seen was it was turning to congealed mush and sitting up in the rocker covers clagged thick solid like and it does not flow at all, it's something like margarine. so many idiots do not change their oil nowadays and the short trips are the worse for oil turning into crap.

But oil does not drain off the engine parts over night or not in use anyway in fact, that's just total BS. I have seen oil sitting on the inside engine parts that were sitting for years.
castellan Online
#136 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 6:27:05 PM(UTC)
castellan

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 26/02/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,503

Thanks: 13 times
Was thanked: 24 time(s) in 22 post(s)
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
Holden had issues with the internal oil pump setup too. I know they made a point of having the oil external as a design feature, among many other things as pointed out.
They really nailed a good design with the cam wear issue being the only real bad point. A lot of that was related to cold start running with city driving I believe. They didn’t seem to have the lobe wear issue if they did long running.


I think people with oil pump issues were just to do with yobbos, not changing their oil and after changing a head gasket all the shit falls down into the engine and is picked up by the oil pump shagging it out.
When I got a Holden V8 I would pull the oil pump down and the amount of metal crud in the bottom that part that holds the spring and piston was totally clogged full of metal, you can just undo the nut and pull the spring etc out, clean all the crap out and put it back in. maybe if it's totally full then metal hammers out the gear set and body and plate. you would think that the oil filter picks up all the metal in the pump but it clearly does not.
HK1837 Offline
#137 Posted : Friday, 16 April 2021 6:38:38 PM(UTC)
HK1837

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 13,571

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 255 time(s) in 246 post(s)
I threw them in the bin and bought a new one. In the 80’s saw a lot of new cams go into 253/308 only to see them buggered again inside a few months. The oil pump was shagged.

Edited by user Friday, 16 April 2021 6:41:47 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

_______________________________________________________
If we all had the same (good) taste, who would buy all the Fords?
Users browsing this topic
Guest
7 Pages«<567
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2021, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.412 seconds.